Youtube: who's content with the content nowadays

Kuchler, H. (2018) “YouTube Tightens Rules for Video Creators to Make Money from Advertising.” Financial Times, www.ft.com/content/49304588-fb24-11e7-a492-2c9be7f3120a. 

This article discusses Youtube's new rules on making money off of videos. The article mentions how in light of the recent Logan Paul video the website is working to moderate content that is uploaded to the site in order. This article is helpful because it mentions the actions youtube is making in order to appeal to advertisers and content creators. 

Blake, R. (2017) “What Nobody Tells You About Being a YouTuber (The YouTube Middle-Class).” Medium, medium.com/@robertoblake/what-nobody-tells-you-about-being-a-youtuber-the-youtube-middle-class-378b77eb8bc9. 

Blake discusses what being youtube middle class is in this article. Youtube middle class creators have high subscriptions numbers but that still isn't enough to have youtube as a full time job paying for everything in their lives. For my episode, the side of youtube being a paying job will be further explored. 

 

I get home from school, jump onto my bed and take out my phone. First thing I do is open Youtube. Now most of the time I have specific videos that I want to watch. Recently I’ve been watching people play games so I watch the newest episodes of playthroughs when they’re uploaded. But when there’s nothing new I just go video hopping between interesting looking videos.  I’ll admit sometimes I click on videos just to judge the people in them. I judge a lot of the “newer” youtubers; people that have come from other social media platforms like Vine or Musica.ly.

In light of a recent Youtube controversy, an article written by Leila El Shenawy for the Charlatan

http://charlatan.ca/2018/01/opinion-not-all-content-deserves-views/

discusses Logan Paul’s vlog about walking through Aokigahara, the “Suicide Forest” in Japan. The video features him finding a dead body. This leads to Shennawy talking about how Youtube is flawed in allowing anyone to upload anything. She also mentions that Youtube has alot to work on in it’s censorship of offensive content, like Logan Paul’s video.

Most of the time I question why. Like why do people watch videos made by so on so or why was this video posted, who watches this, why do people watch this. My concern is “is this what younger kids are really watching today”. Because most youtubers pander to younger audiences, as in tweens. And some things these youtubers are posting seem to be inappropriate for the younger generations.

This isn’t just about Logan Paul. This is bigger than just one youtuber who set a bad example for his fans. Youtube is supposed to be a space where anyone can become a creator, but what does being a creator mean. Creators should be able to post whatever they want; but should they also sacrifice some of their creative potential by censoring their work to be good examples for their younger audience? But also do the audience, have to watch responsibly and still be able to not fall into the trap of becoming what they watch?

Questioning youtube content and it’s creators will be explored more in depth in this episode…