Why we need resources for mental health.

Wilson, Michael and Santa Ono. “Students are not fragile flowers – we must care about their  mental health.”  The Globe and Mail, 2017. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/students-are-not-fragile-flowers-we-must-care-about-their-mental-health/article36498798/. January 28 2018.

This article is a rebuttal of Margaret Wente’s opinion piece “Why treat university students like fragile flowers?”  It focuses on the importance of mental health and how there is such a huge stigma behind it.  It also compares how different physical and mental diseases are treated, and that often mental illnesses are swept under the rug.  Having an opinion that is centred around my initial opinion piece will help me to craft another perspective.  Especially considering that this source is on the other side of the spectrum.  Meaning that it is emphasizing the importance of mental health resources, and that university students in particular, need them.

 

Martineau, Sheila. “Rewriting Resilience: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Childhood      Resilience and the Politics of Teaching Resilience to “Kids At Risk.”” University of British Columbia. 1999. https://open.library.ubc.ca/cIRcle/collections/ubctheses/831/items/1.0055549.      February 4 2018

This study is a critical analysis and focuses on children and resiliency.  It discusses how resiliency used to be something that happened irregularly in times of trauma, but now it is considered something of a social norm.  Author Sheila Martineau also argues that teaching resiliency is forcing children to conform to societal norms.  This article is important because Wente argues that resiliency should be taught in schools, so I wanted to offer a perspective that counteracts that opinion.  Having a another perspective supported by scholarly evidence will help the listener to form their own informed opinion.

 

Alberta Office of the Child and Youth Advocate and Canadian Electronic Library. The case for change : children and youth with complex needs & access to the mental health system. Edmonton, Alberta : Office of the Child and Youth Advocate of Alberta, 2014      http://books1.scholarsportal.info.ezproxy.library.yorku.ca/viewdoc.html?id         =/ebooks/ebooks0/gibson_cppc-chrc/2014-11-25/1/10943031#tabview=tab1. February 4, 2018

    This government document reports the challenges that youths have when navigating the mental health system.  With the Office and the Child and Youth Advocate, Alberta Mental Health Patient Advocate, and the Alberta Centre for Child, Family and Community Research hosted A Policy-Practice Conversation Focusing on Children and Youth With Complex Needs and Access to the Mental Health System.  There one-hundred provincial leaders attended to brainstorm actions to take in order to improve the mental health system.  This is necessary for my project to offer the perspective that the need for mental health resources is essential for youth.  This can apply to Wente’s opinion piece as she offers a perspective that contrasts this belief.  Once again having information that supports this perspective offers validity.

 

 Johnston, Charlotte. “Hey Margaret Wente: We University Students Aren’t “Fragile      Flowers.”” The Huffington Post, 2017. http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/charlotte-johnston/hey-margaret-wente-we-university-students-arent-fragile-flowers_a_23232496/ February 4, 2018.

    This article, written by university student Charlotte Johnston, is an open letter to Margaret Wente articulating their displeasure at being called a “fragile flower.”  However, it goes much deeper than that, she expresses how university accommodations actually help them to succeed rather than coddle them.  She also expresses how important it is to not treat mental illness as sensitivity but rather treat it as a real issue that could lead to death.  I wanted to add another opinion to my research because it gives the perspective of someone who is actually a university student who has used accommodations.  That way we can see how they have helped students to succeed.