Reflections on producing a podcast

Producing a podcast is a lot more difficult than one would imagine initially. Coming into this project, I felt that podcast production would be a relatively simple task that could be done on the fly and didn’t require much expertise. Unfortunately, I was quite wrong, and I needed to adjust my expectations on the fly rather than complete the project in the same manner. For me, the most difficult part of completing the podcast was writing an engaging transcript that sounded as good spoken aloud as it did written on a page. This is apparently a common problem within the podcasting industry, which looks to engage its listeners through a delicate balance of information and entertainment that has no specific formula for success (Ruikar & Demian, 2013, p. 1411). In fact, there is some debate over whether or not this basic and vague conventional approach is even the correct method through which to approach podcasting at all, as more and more podcasts seek to provide unconventional shows in an effort to target audiences that haven’t been tapped into yet by more popular podcasting projects (Wisniewski, 2015, n.p.).

        Of course, I didn’t have to approach podcasting on my own. The internet has a number of valuable resources that can aid in the podcasting process, and the most useful I found was from The Audacity to Podcast website linked here http://theaudacitytopodcast.com/tap100-100-amazing-podcasting-tips-from-successful-podcasters/. This list is the assembled wisdoms of many veterans of successful podcast ventures. The best advice I could give novice podcasters that I learned through my own efforts is number 10 on the list presented here: to always carry around a small notebook where one can write ideas as they come to them (The Audacity to Podcast, 2012, n.p.). Some of my best ideas would’ve been lost had I not had an immediate place to write them, and cellphones are distracting enough that even in the process of opening my word processor on my handheld I might lose the idea. Podcasting is definitely a lucrative genre, as the list of 100 pieces of advice also means that there are 100 successful podcasters making money off of their passion. It is interesting to see how the world of advertising has begun to invade the industry, though. More and more podcasts are becoming sponsored. Where do we draw the line between passion and business? Is there a way to marry the two? It seems like the world of podcasting is placing itself in the position to answer these questions one way or another.

Parisa Malek Khataei

 *References*

The Audacity to Podcast. (2012). 100 amazing podcasting tips from successful podcasters. The Audacity to Podcast. Retrieved from http://theaudacitytopodcast.com/tap100-100-amazing-podcasting-tips-from-successful-podcasters/ .

Ruikar, K., & Deiman, P. (2013). Podcasting to engage industry in project-based learning. *International Journal of Engineering Education, 29*(6), 1410-1419. Retrieved from http://eds.a.ebscohost.com.proxy.library.brocku.ca/eds/detail/detail?sid=46066f93-282d-41a7-b3e9-2fd07a9d6c05@sessionmgr4004&vid=1&hid=4110&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ==#AN=93404057&db=eue

Wisniewski, M. (2015). Umpqua podcast shows industry’s move to unconventional marketing. Business Source Complete, 180(147), n.p. Retrieved from http://web.a.ebscohost.com.proxy.library.brocku.ca/ehost/detail/detail?vid=1&sid=33171539-2ce9-4050-aa63-cdb2dd279661%40sessionmgr4004&hid=4109&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#AN=109547369&db=bth